A beneficent cover

The Duchess Deal Tessa Dare

Yes, we all know that you mustn’t judge by its cover.  From my last review you’ll see I’m a bit guilty of this.  And yep I failed again.  I adore this cover and I just downloaded it.  The designer needs to be on Ms Dare’s Christmas card list for all time.

As for the book?  Well, it lives up to the cover. An absolutely gorgeous read.  I was hooked from the first page and giggled my way through the rest of the book – well, when my heart wasn’t pounding that is.

We’re often warned not to read a book on the tube as you don’t want fellow commuters seeing your tears or hearing you snort.  This isn’t a snorting book, it’s a very delicate witty humour.  Yep, you’ll be the Cheshire Cat grinning at all those stressed commuters.  So go on, read it on the tube – make someone’s day!

I hope I won’t give away too much by saying the book revolves around a proposal or rather a deal.  Ms Dare’s demonstrates her complete mastery of English wit and characterisation:

“If it’s a wife you want,” she said, “surely you could find many women—many well-bred ladies—who would be willing to marry you.”

“Yes, but I’d have to find them. This saves me so much effort.”

She threw him a sidelong glance. “Can you not hear yourself? Do you truly not know how insulting that sounds?”

“I should think it sounds beneficent. I’m offering you a title and fortune. All you have to do is lie back in the dark, then spend nine months swelling up like a tick. What could possibly deter any woman from accepting?”

What indeed? I’m still cackling!

Ash and Emma are simply wonderful, I fell hook, line and sinker for him.  And he’s so deserving.  As for the heat between these two – ooh you’re going to love it. Smoking!

I have to mention Ms Dare’s dedication, I won’t spoil it for you.  Let’s just say there are a few chapters that you might want to rush to read.  Don’t!  Read it properly!

 

Hitting that G spot

          

My Gift to You  by Tracie Delaney 

I wasn’t looking forward to reading this one.  Not sure why really, the blurb, the title, the cover just didn’t do it for me.  But when one of your fave authors offers an ARC – what’s a girl to do?  Say yes of course, and then cross your fingers.

(Updated to say that the author has recently redone the cover, with this gorgeous new image I’d have been pushing to the front of the queue to read  it.)

Well half a page in I’d uncrossed those fingers and then I hit the sweet spot.  Now, I read something the other day that said the female g-spot was a myth. Well, I’m not going to comment on that (you didn’t really think I would did you?), but I can confirm that the reading g-spot exists.  I know, because Tracie Delaney’s latest hits that reading g-spot, grabs hold of you and kind of blows your mind!  And then there’s the after glow – yep, it gave me the warm squidgies all over.

I must mention Gabe.  He’s a hero so hot and so nice that he must have bruises from all those signed pre-nups women throw at him!  He’s just that yummy!  What a departure from all those mean, moody types who find their inner nice guy only with the right lady.  Gabe was born lovely.

As for Livvy, she’s going to grab your heart and squeeze hard.  These two will have your emotions roaring in your ears and tears running down your face. And you’ll love it.  It will warm you up better than tomato soup.

Ms Delaney has certainly hit the sweet spot with her writing style, her Winning Ace series was fab, but this new stand alone book is her best yet.

Thank you to the author for an ARC.  Obviously I wasn’t influenced by being offered an ARC as this is my honest opinion.

Questioning history

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

Well, this has to be one of the more creative and challenging structures for a book.

Two sisters who never meet form the basis of this book as each alternate chapter follows their and then their descendants’ stories.  It is a little hard to read as it does come across as a series of short stories.  There are some wide open and very definite holes in these vinaigrettes.  The impact of these missing stories is gruelling, and it’s hard to accept that was (and is) the reality for many.

This book will challenge most reader’s views on slavery and race.  It’s powerful and disturbing with a real strength of purpose, a first class choice for bookclubs.

There are many ‘lessons’ in it, but what has stayed with me was the reminder that history is written by the victors, by the powerful.  In this time of fake news and global perspectives, it’s a reminder we all need.  And one we must like the teacher in the book impart to our children.

This quote has remained with me:

“We believe the one who has power. He is the one who gets to write the story. So when you study history, you must ask yourself, Whose story am I missing? Whose voice was suppressed so that this voice could come forth? Once you have figured that out, you must find that story too. From there you get a clearer, yet still imperfect, picture.”

Put it on your list for your next bookclub choice, loads to think and talk about.